The Autistic Journalist

Using words to explain the mind

Posts Tagged ‘Temple Grandin

Temple Grandin, promoter of strength

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Temple Grandin, right, signs autographs and chats with two spectators following a lecture at SUNY Ulster. Photo by Kelly Dornicik

Autism’s longest-recognized advocate made another splash on Friday at SUNY Ulster in New York. Temple Grandin, who earned the respect of her professional peers and the admiration of a nation after her designs for cattle-handling facilities were widely adopted, promoted pushing autistic children out of their shells during her speech. Michael Novinson of the Times Herald-Record was there to cover her appearance.

Grandin has consistently emphasized teaching basic manners and social skills for autistic children, as well as channeling their interests as a parlay for employable skills. Her firsthand experience is referred to by supporters as living validation that a “marketing strategy” is beneficial. While Grandin had difficulty integrating with her peers on a social level in agriculture engineering classes, they quickly latched on when she presented her sketches (although she noted encountering a few skeptics in her first book, Thinking in Pictures). Grandin also spoke about the increasing prevalence of medicating autistic children. She believes exercise and dietary changes should be implemented first to address behavioral issues in autistic children, and medication only if previous methods are unsuccessful.

Compared to other stories I’ve discussed in the last week, Novinson’s article is a simple event coverage story. Readers who know of Temple Grandin already have some familiarity with her life story, but her name recognition continues to attract press coverage from local reporters when she visits their coverage area. Novinson only quotes Grandin from her speech and bookends the story with two sources who weren’t given quotes, but still displayed the mentally stimulating effect Grandin carries as a speaker. A similar approach is seen with Novinson’s short add-on about autism and medication.

Speeches and press conferences possess the fluidity of water; no two events run by separate organizers will be alike in their approach. While reporters can receive press releases or schedules revealing the event’s course and time frame, they have to be prepared to incorporate speakers in whatever capacity they offer. There may not have been a one-on-one with Grandin scheduled out of personal discomfort, time constraints, or another reason totally unrelated to either theory. Ideally, most journalists will attempt to conduct a one-on-one before or after a lecture, and if that plan is unsuccessful, they’ll rely on the speech itself to guide the story.

Covering Grandin is a challenge in itself; she’s appeared in virtually all forms of storytelling through her own books, a documentary, TV appearances and an HBO film with Claire Danes assuming her character. The best tip for reporters is not to stress over one-upping others who filed reports on Grandin, but recognize the significance of the story she creates.

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Written by TheSportsBrain

April 24, 2011 at 10:58 am

Temple Grandin preaches autistic skills at Minnesota

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Continuing to catch up on my articles, a friend of mine linked a Star Tribune story in late February highlighting a Minnesota visit from Temple Grandin, who spoke at the inaugural Autism and Employment Forum at 3M’s headquarters. 

3M, Cargill, Best Buy and the Autism Society of Minnesota sponsored the event, designed to raise awareness and boost hiring levels of autistic people, where the employment rate is a measly three percent (lower than the winning percentage of the Minnesota Timberwolves). While the general lack of social skills can present obstacles in finding a full-time job, employees of the event sponsors believe autistics are the largest untapped pool of talent. Grandin suggested Silicon Valley, Hollywood, corporate labs and IT departments are loaded with “well-paid” individuals who would fall on the spectrum (autism’s diagnosis rate is difficult to track with people who may be autistic but not carry an official diagnosis).

Grandin’s biggest suggestion for employers was to be specific because most autistic people may misinterpret what is being said. She listed an example of taking a 30-minute lunch break within a two-hour time block instead of saying the lunchroom is available from the opening to closing time.

I can relate to the difficulties of finding employment, especially with my chosen field and media market size (the Twin Cities is the 15th largest market and larger organizations skew towards veterans of the journalism trade). Unless you plan to relocate to a smaller market (and most of my peers who decided to stick with journalism have), freelancing and networking are two ways to offset the lack of regular work that has come my way. Social skills are a must with my profession, as I frequently have to make eye contact with my colleagues and subjects. Fortunately, implementing those facets aren’t difficult as I enter my third season covering the Minnesota Lynx and wrapped up my fifth season covering high school basketball.

Dee DePass’ story is no surprise for two reasons: the keynote speaker is the most highly-regarded individual on the autism spectrum, and Grandin’s keynote highlighted an issue that will face virtually all autistic people as the population sees an increase of aging spectrum inhabitants. However, the forum tackled just one facet of the challenge with autism and employment from the employer’s perspective. In terms of job hunting, little is known about how that will be addressed. Will it require autistic people to apply and perform job interviews? Will there be a job fair designed for people on the spectrum to meet with prospective employers? Those are future questions for further exploration in this division of autism news coverage. DePass’ story is effective with showing how adding autistic people can enrich the workroom for the same factor that leads to the hiring of others: the skill sets may be similar, but with every person comes an opportunity to improve and grow. Cargill expressed their gratitude with Grandin at the forum, who pioneered equipment designed to better handle animals.

If nothing else, readers may hopefully grasp the notion that employers are taking notice and adapting to the needs of a new breed of workers, which may calm even my concerns as I continue my quest of networking and job-searching. DePass’ story doesn’t account for the job market itself, but employment opportunities as a whole can be discussed elsewhere.