The Autistic Journalist

Using words to explain the mind

Posts Tagged ‘Twitter

Holly Robinson Peete shares her odds-beating strategy

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Holly Robinson-Peete, co-host of The Talk

I’ve discussed the fissure autism can bring to families in previous posts, with the divorce rate among parents of autistic children significantly higher than the national average. Holly Robinson Peete of 21 Jump Street and Hangin’ with Mr. Cooper fame and current co-host of CBS’ The Talk, has a clear sense of those odds based on an interview she conducted with CBS 21, a local network affiliate in Pennsylvania. In the profile piece, she highlighted how an autism diagnosis of her now-teenage son RJ nearly caused a divorce between Holly and her husband, former NFL quarterback Rodney Peete. Rodney denied the diagnosis when RJ first received it at age 3, and Holly quoted how she and Rodney shouldn’t be married on paper.

Fortunately, their marriage is still alive on paper and Holly talked about how their family approach supports the HollyRod foundation, which the two started to help other families struggling with autism. Holly is using her Twitter account to promote bracelets she’s selling to benefit people affected by autism. Earlier this month, she appeared on CBS’ daytime juggernaut, The Price is Right, to cross-promote The Talk and present a showcase of prizes she selected that can help families of autistic children, which included a set of iPads. Holly also co-wrote a book with her daughter, Ryan, about their experience growing up with RJ.

The story itself was likely not too difficult to set up, as interviewing personalities of the national network a local station is affiliated with is a common practice. That’s not to say Holly and other notables from ABC, NBC and FOX won’t appear on stations not affiliated with their respective networks, but local stations won’t be afraid to vet what’s on their timeslots. This interview also doesn’t surprise me because April is Autism Awareness Month, and Holly has used the calendar to bring RJ and Rodney on the set of The Talk, where the hosts share a roundtable discussion about autism on Fridays through the month of April. With the need to constantly fill time slots, CBS 21 decided reaching out to their national “cousin” would promote many things while killing a couple minutes on the newscast’s timeline. The story is more a byproduct of the relationship that unfolds when a local station is picked up by a for-profit national affiliate than a case of lazy reporting. CBS 21 also used this story to highlight a visit Holly and Rodney will make in August within their coverage area, as they will speak at a Greater Harrisburg Area Autism Society event this August.

Although the bottom-line is always omni-present, CBS 21’s profile of Holly’s promotional efforts does provide a glimpse of celebrities struggling through the same obstacles as less famous parents of autistic children, helping those without national profiles relate. Will it draw millions of viewers to The Talk? Not necessarily, but families affected by autism are always looking for role models.

Wakefield remains firm about “fraudulent” study

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Photo by Steve Parsons, PA Wire

The discovery of “doctored information” on Andrew Wakefield’s discredited study linking vaccinations to autism has generated a lot of publicity and fuel for news outlets, and little time was wasted in pursuing the major angles involving this week’s development.

Although evidence refuting a link continues to grow, support for Wakefield and his study in question has yet to shrink. An independent survey reported 58.3% of respondents dissatisfied with research investigating a relationship conducted and/or funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (which may stem from a general distrust in government, as Congress has had dismal approval ratings for years while conspiracy theories remain abundant). 90% of those surveyed want to see studies comparing vaccinated and unvaccinated people to see if there’s a difference (Frontline addressed this issue with The Vaccine War last year). Wakefield still supports his study, first published in 1998.

Jenny McCarthy’s organization, Generation Rescue, claimed the media was mischaracterizing Wakefield’s work. McCarthy was quoted on The Vaccine War saying she’d rather risk her child getting mumps than autism and is a strong supporter of reducing the number of vaccinations a child receives.

Most who follow and/or studied media will tell you that media’s a popular target when news is reported that contradicts an argument for a sensitive topic. Media’s fluidity and the rapid pace news spreads certainly contribute in the present, but “blaming the media” existed as far back as Senator Joe McCarthy’s “witch hunt” of the 1950s, when he accused Edward R. Murrow of supporting Communists after Murrow published several reports with CBS on McCarthy’s activities.

Jenny, while not related to the late U.S. Senator, isn’t any more immune to blowback than Joe was. The Generation Rescue statement has Twitter users taking a swipe at Jenny for a perceived lack in parenting skills. And we’re only through the first week of 2011. Imagine what the next 51 could bring to this debate.

While the developments are new, the story itself hasn’t changed. In effect, AOL News considered Deer’s research that led to his suggestion of Wakefield’s study being fraudulent represented one side of the argument; that his research is invalid because of “tainted evidence.” While I doubt any reporter would be accused of bias simply for running that story, AOL News deemed interviewing the flip side of the debate, where belief that vaccinations are responsible for causing autism, worthwhile. Deborah Huso’s article effectively illustrates what I explained yesterday about two sides of an argument always attempting to one-up each other, resulting in a never-ending debate. The other factor, of course, remains the lack of a concrete detection method. Until that day comes, the cycle of latching on to a theory that appears to make sense will continue.

The most intriguing element in the vaccine debate’s latest chapter is the response toward Wakefield’s supporters. While a continuously present stream of thoughts exist on Twitter due to its nature, this is the first time I’ve seen social media used in a news story related to Deer’s investigation. While it’s technically impossible to gauge why McCarthy is taking a Twitter assault, consumers are known to grow weary over denials in the face of indisputable evidence or even an association to the contrary. Although it’s illogical to judge parenting skills based on one element of being a parent, that won’t stop opinions from being expressed online, and that in itself could indicate public perception of a controversial topic.

Deer’s discovery and reaction won’t be the last chapter in the vaccine debate. In fact, the recent news has already made a local impact in the Twin Cities area (my “home base”), and I’ll examine how they approached the fraudulent data claim in my next post. Until then, expect the patterns I’ve detailed in this post to persist when a future development is published about the refuted link between autisms and immunizations.